Author:Fran

No-Sew Shibori Fabric Planter

Having tried making so many planters for my ever growing green buddies if there was just one thing that I couldn’t keep my mind off were fabric planters. There is something about the folds that appear quite alluring to me. But was I ready to stitch? Not really I am not comfortable with sewing machine which is why fabric glue came to my rescue. And needless to say, it was a no-brainer that dying the fabric with my We Make Collective Shibori kit would be perfect to make them fabric planters. Materials: We Make Collective Shibori Kit Fabric Glue Scissors Jar lids ( for the round ones ) Prepare your dye as per the instructions of the kit here. Let your dye sit for an hour or so until there is a cluster of foam floating on top of the dye bath that is when you know that your dye is ready...

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Rag Rug Kit Included in your kit: Rag Rugger | 35mm Rug Gauge | 75mm Rug Gauge | 5 Rolls of Fabric | Base Fabric My first experience with rag rugging takes me back around 10 years. I first tried it out in a victorian back to back house as an example of how women used to recycle and reuse old textiles. Hence the name rag rugging. It was literally a way to make rugs out of your old rags! Now this is a really fun way to make a rug but in this ecourse I wanted to explore the technique and do more with it. Instead of creating rugs we will be exploring how to expand the use to a bigger range of objects and make something modern from an older skill. All of the techniques can still be used to create a rug of course! But before embarking on such a large project in...

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Creating Even Fabric Strips

When you're rag rugging with individual strips of fabric the whole piece will look much more finished if you're using evenly sized pieces. But cutting each piece of fabric could take longer than making the piece itself! That's where your rug gauges come in. This is a quick and easy way to get perfect pieces of fabric to rug with. 1. Wrap the strips of fabric around the gauge. The idea is to move from one end of the gauge to the other end evenly. 2. When you've finished wrapping hold the fabric in place, open up your scissors and slip one side into the groove in the gauge and the other side over the top of the fabric. Cut along the length of the gauge letting the fabric strips fall as you go. And now your strips are ready! This works the same way on both size gauges. To make the most of your...

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Making Tassels from Strips

This second way of creating the tassel rag rug is the more traditional version. Instead of using the rugger as a hook we use it as a bodger or poker. The fabric yarn is pre-cut into small strips that are used to create the tassels. This works best if all the strips of fabric are the same size. That's where the rug gauges come in. Click here to see the tutorial on using the gauge to cut even fabric strips. 1. Once you have the strips cut, use the end of the rugger to push the end of one fabric strip through the backing fabric from the front to the back, then back through to the front. Push it back out close to, but not in the same place that you pushed it in. 2. Pull the rugger back out of the backing fabric leaving the strip in place. Even up...

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Making Rug Tassels from Loops

There are two ways to make the tassels typical in a rag rug. This way uses the looping technique first before snipping the loops into two. You can use this technique to create shorter or longer tassels depending on how long the loops are. It's especially useful if you want to create a piece of fabric with both styles. You can also create patterns within the rug using just loops and tassels. Using this technique makes that much easier and quicker! ...

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Creating Long Loops

This technique is almost identical to the short loops. Follow the instructions for creating those but pull the loop through until you are happy with the longer length. When I'm making these longer loops I like to position the loops on the second row in between the first row loops rather than directly beneath them. ...

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Rugging Small Loops

Let's start with making small loops. This is a great way to add different textures and looks to your rag rug. Traditionally the rug is a tasselled look (which can be made using this technique - head here next) but there's no reason not to create a range of different looks in one piece! First of all make the yarn for your rag rugs - check out this tutorial to find out how to do that. Always leave an inch of your base fabric around the edge of the rugging. This ensures the fabric doesn't fray to the point where the yarn falls out of the weave. 1. Hold the end of the rug against the back of your base fabric close to where you want to start the rugging. 2. Still holding the yarn in place turn the fabric back over. Push the hook into the fabric where you want the rug to start. ...

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Make the Yarn

The first thing you are going to need to do to get started on your rag rug piece is make the yarn. This can be done in a variety of fabrics but I've chosen to give you jersey fabric in the kits. The greatest benefit of using this fabric is how it behaves when you cut it into strips. Jersey doesn't fray which gives the rag rug finish a cleaner look. It also stretches into a yarn type coil of fabric which is lovely and easy to work with. You can experiment with other fabric types. Rag rugs were traditionally made using old and unusable fabrics, so basically anything that came to hand. Any garment that couldn't be mended or scraps that had no use. With this in mind rag rugging is a great way to use up odd pieces of fabric or clothing you're going to throw away. Tshirts made...

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Creating Shapes with a Cookie Cutter

When you first start to needle felt making shapes can be a little bit intimidating. While you get used to the materials (and even after you're a pro) it can be much easier to use cookie cutters as templates for more elaborate shapes. They are also a great way to make sure your fingers stay out of danger. 1. Place the cookie cutter onto the sponge. Prepare the wool and fill the inside of the shape. Use your needle to pierce the wool inside the cutter. Keep turning the cutter over so there is even coverage. Once the shape is firm remove from the cutter and clean up the edges. Now you have a perfect shape with minimum effort! ...

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Mini Avocado Pouch

I included this fabric pouch to hold your needle holder as the perfect way to try out felting onto fabric with just the materials included in the kit. You can try out any of the tutorials on your pouch but I particularly wanted to try out a mini avocado. I'll probably add a few more to this and maybe cover the surface in these lovely green goodies. Before you begin empty the pouch if you have not already. You won't need the needle holder as we'll just be using a single needle so place that to one side. You'll either need an additional small piece of sponge. Something like a dish sponge will work well. Alternatively slice a small section of your sponge off with a retractable knife. You'll need this to insert into the fabric bag. This stops the two sides fusing while you are felting. Place the bag with the sponge...

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